Hairstyle Tutorials: Best Styles for Spring and Summer

Spring: The time of flings, fun, and a lot of time running around in the sun. You obviously want to look your best at this playful time of year -- but with as little time and effort as possible!

We asked some of our favorite celebrity stylists for their top hairstyle tutorials for great, simple -- and hot! -- looks for the steamy season.  

Textured Tail
“Beachy waves can instantly glam up any style when you opt for a textured tail,” says Fernando Salas, renowned master stylist and founder of the White Sands corporation. To create this look, forget typical roller sets and opt for adjustable, no-pull Velcro strips to fashion loosely sculpted curls.

1. To get lift with a slight texture on the ends, start with wet hair and take 2-inch sections of hair. Spritz each section with styling spray, then lay a Velcro strip underneath. Roll the Velcro strip toward your head into a roller. Repeat until all your hair is rolled, using clips to hold in place.

2. Let hair air dry or apply a dryer for roughly 4-5 minutes, allowing the new
desired texture to cool before removing the clips.

3. Take out the clips and Velcro strips, combing the style out if needed
to loosen the waves.

4. Use your hands to gently sweep your tresses up into a ponytail, bringing down layers to frame your face if desired.

5. Spray with a flexible hold hairspray for a shiny, touchable style that lasts.

The High Bun
Variations of the classic bun have been popular with everyone from ballerinas to CEOs. Recently, women have combined the elements of the “messy bun” with the coiffed look of the chignon to create what is known as a high bun. 

“High buns require little time, and they are easy to achieve with your natural hair, braids and extensions, which makes it the perfect style for those hot summer days,” says Mary Malave, owner of Brooklyn-based Salon Malave. Try these tips to create this look:

1. First, smooth your hair and gather it on top of your head (you may find it easiest to bend over and let your hair fall forward).

2. Use some elastic bands to secure your hair into a high ponytail.

3. Twist this ponytail into a knot.

4. Use the bobby pins to secure the knot on top of your head, and you’re
ready to go!

Easy Organic Braids
“Braids have come back with a hot vengeance, making appearances on runways, red carpets and our favorite celebrities,” says Luis Alvarez, international hairstylist, photographer and the cofounder of Aquage. “Achieving a random, organic braid is simple if you have the right products and tricks.”

1. First, prep hair with a volumizing product to ensure it has the grip and lift needed.

2. Next, take a 2-inch horizontal section of hair and divide into three equal strands. Braid down the section until about 4 inches of hair is left at the bottom, placing the outer left strand in the left hand. Slide the other two sections toward the scalp to create a gathered braid.

3. Continue to braid, adding only left sections of hair. Make sure each time you cross over the right side you add a new section of hair from underneath while moving around the circumference of the head.

4. When you reach the left side of the head, add a new section when crossing over the right side only.

5. When complete, deconstruct the braid by pulling pieces out a couple inches, gently and slowly. Finish off with a fine-mist hair spray.

How to Style Hair Without Heat

You may never be fully dressed without a smile -- and the same goes for great hair. Beautiful tresses are a powerful thing for women, and many of us turn to blow-dryers, straighteners and curling irons every day as the path to a polished look.

However, these hot styling tools can damage healthy hair if they’re used too often. Break out of your heat haze, find your new go-to ‘do (no matter your hair type) and commence a little mane damage control to keep your lovely strands, well…lovely! Here’s how to style hair without heat.

Hair Solutions: Braids, Buns, “Born” (a.k.a. Natural)
Always look to the three B’s: Braids. Buns. Born (and by “born,” we mean natural):

  • Braids: The braid is the new black, figuratively speaking. This ever-versatile style lends a certain boho-chicness to an ensemble, plus it requires little to no effort (and especially no heat!) and can be worn in a variety of ways. Try a messy side braid for a casual look, a crown of plaits for an über-romantic vibe, or a partial side-swept version to tame unruly bangs.
  • Buns: Be it a low chignon or a high topknot, buns are the instant-chic answer to the persistent “what to do with my hair” question. This style beautifully transitions from office to happy hour, is flattering for every hair type, and, to top it off, works best with locks that have a little texture on them (read: not freshly washed or styled). Try gently teasing a high ponytail before twisting your hair up and bobby-pinning it for a fuller look that is special-event worthy without doing any damage.
  • Born: Many women have a bad habit of wanting what they don’t have, especially when it comes to hair. Instead of using heat tools to force your hair to do what it doesn’t do naturally, embrace what Mother Nature gave you -- with a little help from styling products.

“Air-drying, especially if your texture is curly or wavy, is a great way to style without heat,” says Luca Blandi, senior stylist at the Oscar Blandi salon in Manhattan. “A little extra conditioner after a shampoo will make it beautiful.”

Vaso Spirou, owner of Salon Vaso in Miami Beach, Fl., and her team at the salon agree: “Depending on the event -- work or play -- a simple styling product to add wave and movement is all you need for beautiful hair without the heat.”

Undo the Damage
How much heat is too much? Spirou recommends turning to heat styling tools no more than once a week. “Especially in sunny climates, you really want to limit your use to keep your hair healthy. Use an at-home deep conditioning treatment to recharge your strands and bring them back to health.” To get the most out of a conditioning hair mask, cover your strands with the mask, then cover with a shower cap and let your body heat do the work while you do chores for half an hour.

You can also make the styles you achieve with heated tools last longer between washes, says Blandi. Sprinkle your roots with a dry shampoo to keep your hair looking fresh. And, of course, never underestimate the power of a trim. Since your tips show the most wear-and-tear, snipping them off every few months will keep your tresses fresh and healthy.

Use Heat Wisely
When you do use curling irons and straighteners, “look for tools with ionic capabilities and titanium plates, which are less damaging,” says Spirou. Good tools should also have temperature-control options so you can keep the heat on the lowest setting. Lastly, don’t forget to reach for hair prep before heating things up. “A heat-protecting treatment or spray before styling will shield your hair and make it less vulnerable to damage,” says Blandi.

Repair Winter Damage -- Fast! -- With These Beauty Tips and Tricks

Winter’s here -- and so are all the beauty challenges it holds. Cold, dry outdoor air and overheated indoor environments make for limp, static-y locks, tight, uncomfortable skin, chapped lips and cracked soles. So not appealing.

The good news? Our beauty tips and tricks will help you repair winter damage fast.

Hair
To fight dry hair and split ends, choose products with rich conditioning ingredients, says board-certified New York City dermatologist Whitney Bowe. “Look for products containing wheat protein, which targets and repairs hair’s most damaged parts without a greasy buildup near the scalp.” The other ingredients you want to see in your shampoo and conditioners? Powerful natural hydrators and masks such as oat protein, dimethicone, macadamia nut seed oil, green tea extract, olive oil, algae extract, shea butter, argan oil, glycerin, wild mango butter and sunflower extract. Cetrimonium chloride also has conditioning and anti-static properties.

Scalp itch and dandruff typically worsen in the winter. “Try using dandruff shampoo,” says Elizabeth Tanzi, a board-certified dermatologist in Washington, DC. “If that still isn’t enough, visit your dermatologist for a scalp solution prescription.”

Face
When skin doesn’t produce enough sebum (or oil), it can get rough, irritated, inflamed, sensitive and flaky -- and wrinkles are more pronounced, explains celebrity aesthetician Renée Rouleau. Winter’s dry air steals even more moisture from your face.

To avoid damage, don’t use harsh scrubs. Wash your face with lukewarm or cool water and a low-lather, creamy cleanser containing soothing ingredients like green tea, aloe vera extract or chamomile. Apply a hydrating serum with marine extract, vitamins C and A, azulene, hyaluronic acid and lipids; then follow up with a good moisturizer containing flower and nut extracts (rose hips, lavender, geranium, macadamia, grape seed), dimethicone and glycolic acid. At night, adds Rouleau, use a humidifier in your room to rehydrate your skin.

Soft, smooth skin comes from the inside as well. Eat plenty of cold-water fish such as tuna, sardines, cod, mackerel, herring and trout, which have the essential fats your skin needs. And remember to drink plenty of water.

Lips
Rule number one: Don’t lick them! Wear lip balm with dimethicone and petroleum, and reapply often.

Body
To relieve dry skin and eczema, Tanzi recommends taking only one bath or shower daily and using a moisturizing body wash with lavender or oatmeal. As soon as you get out of the tub, treat your whole body to a thick lotion or cream with shea or cocoa butter, sesame oil, petroleum and ceramides to lock in hydration.

Elbows and Heels
Exfoliate rough patches with urea-rich healing creams, applied every night. “Then use a pumice stone or washcloth to gently remove the dead skin, and follow up with a ceramide moisturizer in the morning,” says Tanzi.

Feet
Try this bedtime foot treatment from Stafford R. Broumand, a board-certified Manhattan plastic surgeon: Apply a thick layer of plain petroleum jelly all over your feet, and cover them with cotton socks. “When you wake up and remove the socks in the morning,” he says, “your feet will be soft and smooth.”

Hands
All the soap and sanitizers you use to prevent colds can also dry out your hands and nails. Instead, “use a gentle cleanser to wash,” says Tanzi, “and before bed, smear on petroleum jelly or a thick hand cream [honey and shea butter are excellent ingredients], and cover up with cotton gloves overnight.”

For ragged cuticles, apply cuticle oil before the hand cream; you want one containing vitamin E, shea butter and oils such as jojoba, argan and sweet almond. Then follow Bowe’s example and keep a tube of soothing hand lotion by the bathroom and kitchen sink so you can apply a dollop every time you wash your hands.

Photo: Corbis Images